3Sixty

3Sixty

Eyes on Cambodia

Explore Cambodia through the eyes of Muslim Friendly Indochina Blog Contest winners – Wan Mokhsen Wan Mohd and Maruwiah Ahmat.

Images: Wan Mokhsen Wan Mohd; Maruwiah Ahmat and AirAsia.

Our Adventure in Cambodia

by Wan Mokhsen Wan Mohd

Our adventure (my cute better half :-) and me) in Cambodia started with us flying with AirAsia on Jun 2011 has left us with a thousand sweet memories. And best of all we had no plan at all. We had merely skimmed through Wikitravel and AirAsia websites and these had provided us with some handy information on Phnom Penh and Siem Reap.

     Upon arriving in Phnom Penh, we were greeted by a man wearing a fez, which was somewhat startling as this man was someone whom we had never met before, and with whom we had no appointment.

“Assalamualaikum. You’re from Malaysia, aren’t you?” said our greeter.

WaalaikummussalamErr…” I replied, but was abruptly interrupted…

Don’t worry. I won’t cheat you… Just follow me…”

     Convinced, I followed him and he introduced himself as Ustaz Salleh, the driver of a three-wheeled taxi (similar to the tuk-tuks in Bangkok). He asked about our travel expenses and we replied that we were travelling on a low budget.

     Beaming with reassurance and with a sense of gratitude, he gave us some details about a direct travel and accommodation package to Siem Reap. “JUST OUR BUDGET!!!” was what my heart shouted at me and I turned to my wife for her consent. She nodded and thus the adventure began.

     Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, is an old city gearing up for new development. On a visit here, you will surely feel the fortitude of the city folks as they earn a living and work hard with the common objective of lifting themselves out of poverty. This remarkable fortitude touched us deeply.

     My wife and I had been supplied with all sorts of food, such as instant noodles, by my mother-in-law. However, it isn’t actually that difficult to find restaurants selling halal food in Cambodia. As such, we took advantage of the opportunity to try out the local dishes! They were delicious and unique! What’s more, KFC is also available here. It’s halal and owned by KFC Malaysia! :-P

     The Muslim community in Cambodia has been given economic freedom by the government and preaching activities are making significant progress, despite prevalent discrimination. Travelling with Ustaz Salleh also made a difference. It had been our wish to meet with the Muslim community and having Ustaz Salleh acting as our tour guide worked out perfectly. We were taken to Cambodia’s Muslim Village in Phnom Penh, where we visited mosques that had set up learning centres for Muslim children and where we also witnessed the economic activities of the local Muslim society.

     Sadness, sorrow, grief and amazement – such were the mixed feelings we had. It was sad for us to see the discrimination against their society and the worn out facilities that they have to live with. But it was amazing to see the spirit and concerted efforts of the Muslim community to embrace development. As for the religious teachers, though their incomes are solely dependent on contributions from external sources and local societies, they are devoted to imparting their religious knowledge to the children.

     It’s interesting to note that in most of the religious schools, they follow the Malaysian curriculum and the language used is Bahasa Malaysia! :-D

     We continued with our tour to Siem Reap by bus. Be alert when buying bus tickets. Make sure to buy tickets only at the kiosks and to ask for a receipt. There are plenty of con-artists around who take advantage of unsuspecting foreigners. I had the opportunity to chat with several other tourists and most of them had fallen prey to these swindlers. I count my blessings for not being a victim.

Beautiful scenery! Our eyes feasted on the picturesque landscape. Throughout the journey, we were moved by the sight of children running here and there, playing games, and having fun in the fields and rivers (and ditches?), while others were helping their parents to earn a living. Mesmerised by the scenic surroundings, we fell asleep.

     Upon reaching Siem Reap, we were received by a member of Ustaz Salleh’s team. It was already late at night, so we were sent straight to the hotel, with an arrangement made for us to meet the next morning and savour the local delicacies! I was all smiles before slumbering away. :-D

     The much awaited morning finally arrived. We had our breakfast at a stall next to Siem Reap mosque. It tasted great!! In particular, the Cambodian Coffee (a must-try) was marvellous. We bought packs of Cambodian Coffee powder from the makcik who spoke fluent Malay and had once worked in Malaysia. The conversation between us then turned to the attractions of Siem Reap.

     We did not visit Angkor Wat, as we decided to leave more time for our trip to the Muslim village and to pay homage at the surrounding mosques. We toured around the mighty Tonlé Sap lake while admiring the floating mosques. The Muslim community in Tonlé Sap (with its shrinking population) are refugees from Vietnam. We could sympathise with their plight of having to fight for their survival.

     There are many more stories to tell concerning Cambodia. If you wish to explore the country, by all means pay a visit yourself. Comfortable AirAsia flights await you, promising only the best value!

Kuala Lumpur (KUL) – Phnom Penh (PNH)
2 x DAILY

 

Flight No

From

To

Depart

Arrive

AK1476

KUL

PNH

06:45

07:35

AK1474

KUL

PNH

15:00

12:55

 

Kuala Lumpur (KUL) – Siem Reap (REP)
DAILY FLIGHTS

 

Flight No

From

To

Depart

Arrive

AK1480

KUL

REP

06:50

07:50

* Departure and arrival times are according to local time zones.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

An Account of My Cambodian Trip

By Maruwiah Ahmat

Cambodia has a peculiar history. Apart from the glorious days of the bygone Khmer Empire in Angkor, there have also been dark ages that still linger in the memory of its people – the cruel treatment experienced during the Pol Pot regime under the Communist Party of Kampuchea. Nevertheless, this legacy of Cambodian history has turned Cambodia into a tourist attraction. More than 2 million tourists visit Angkor City annually and today tourism is an important economic source for Cambodia, second only to the textile industry.

     Though having attained peace only as recently as 1975, Cambodia is fast developing, which can be attributed to its industrious population who are seldom seen asking for charity. The vast majority of Cambodians work hard to earn a living, despite earning through such humble means as selling floral hoops (for the purpose of performing prayers or seeking blessings from Buddhist disciples) at a price of 500 riel (USD 0.25) each.

     I went to Cambodia with a friend (Norsiah Harun) on 9 May. We reached Phnom Penh at around 4:00pm local time. From the plane, I could see a vast stretch of uncultivated land. According to the Vietnamese lady who was sat beside me, Cambodia is much hotter than Malaysia. I knew this and was mentally prepared for it. Upon arrival at the airport and at the invitation of the hotel driver, we only had to pay the parking fee of 3500 riel (USD 0.88) for the car to our hotel. We stayed at Asia Hotel, at a rate of only USD 25 per night. Interestingly, the KFC restaurant inside the hotel has a halal sign displayed on its door.

     On the following day, we went out in a tut tut (Uncle Rom’s), which cost us USD 1, to the New York Hotel, where we patronised the D’Wau Restaurant operated by a Malay from Malaysia. I had Pattaya Rice while Norsiah ordered Lok Lak Rice (with a Cambodian influence). Both dishes were absolutely yummy. It was indeed gratifying to be able to enjoy tasty halal food in a foreign land. After the meal, the restaurant owner offered us some tips on travelling around Phnom Penh and Siem Reap. A tut tut driver (Zamry – a Malay Cam who professed to be Muslim) was also there. We asked him to take us to the Central Market, also at the cost of USD 1.

     From the Central Market, we walked back to Asia Hotel and had a rest. Asia Hotel is located just 280m from Holiday Inn, which is owned by a Malaysian and also provides halal food. That night, we ordered food to our hotel room and tried some Cambodian delicacies. I had Cambodian mango salad and a traditional Khmer dish of cuttlefish and fish.

     On Monday, we went to Siem Reap by bus at a cost of USD 24 per person. The bus departed at 7:00am and it took about 6 hours to get to Siem Reap. Tourists visiting Siem Reap do not normally return to Phnom Penh, or they visit Siem Reap before going to Phnom Penh. We opted for the return trip but paid a higher price for experiencing something new.

     As usual, tut tuts were waiting at the bus station on our return and the drivers were keen to act as tour guides. We continued on our journey to Angkor City, where entrance cost us USD 20 per person. We did not take our time visiting the three major temples as we were fearful of missing prayer time. The tut tut driver told us that we were the fastest to complete our visit, as tourists usually spend 2 to 3 hours in each temple. But we visited all three in 3 hours: our aim was simply to see the relics of the glorious past of the Angkor Empire. The tut tut driver then took us to a Siem Reap mosque about a kilometre outside the city centre.

     At around 5:00pm, we reached Naekmah Mosque, which was undergoing renovation. A Malay Cam, whose house was near the mosque, approached us and invited us to pray in his house. Alhamdulillah. Without hesitation, we followed him. A makcik from the neighbourhood, who also spoke the Malay language, came along to greet us. She stayed until the end of prayers.

     After leaving the house, we stopped at a nearby Restoran Muslim. We were really hungry as we hadn’t eaten since breakfast at 6:00am in the hotel. Alhamdulillah, the food, cooked in a Thai style, was delicious. The most gratifying part was that the meal only cost us USD 7.50.

     After our meal, we walked into Siem Reap Town which was just 1km from the mosque and the restaurant. In the town, my friend took the time to surf the internet in a cybercafé, while I went to a spa to have a reflexology treatment which cost only USD 5 for one hour. This was very cheap; such a price could not be found anywhere in Malaysia.

     At around 7:00pm we reached the bus station that would take us to Phnom Penh. I was momentarily astonished. Have you ever boarded a bus with no seats? I wondered if such means of transportation could be found in other parts of the world too, but this was my very first time on a Night Bus. As the name suggests, these buses operate only at night. Instead of seats, beds like those in hospitals were provided, only with the head sections tilted slightly upwards. We were not the only ones who found it amusing and started giggling. The European tourists who boarded the same bus were also amused by it. In fact, this new experience provided us with entertainment for quite a while. Fortunately, our beds were on the upper level and so we did not feel crowded. We were also supplied with a bottle of mineral water each and the 6-hour journey was not really boring – our otherwise sound sleep was only occasionally interrupted by the honking of the bus’s horn.

     In Cambodia, as in Indonesia, the honking of a horn is meant to give a warning. As such, the sound of honking is often heard. The scenario is different in Malaysia, where horns are sounded only in critical situations – though less frequently heard, the sound of a horn carries the message of anger, or at least annoyance. We called it a day at 1:42am when we reached Phnom Penh.

     On Tuesday, after breakfast, we went to the Killing Fields, where the brutal execution of large numbers of people took place when Cambodia was under the control of the Khmer Rouge regime. The tut tut fare was USD 10 for us to travel to this place, which is located on the edge of Phnom Penh. Entrance cost USD 5 with an audio guide in various languages and USD 2 without an audio guide. We were saddened by what we saw and by the stories we heard. I was close to tears but managed to control myself, but I saw several female foreign tourists sobbing upon hearing the tragic stories.

     After returning from the Killing Fields, we enjoyed lunch in the hotel. I ate Tom Yam, while my friend had Claypot Rice. We rested in the hotel before going back to Malaysia the next morning.

     Although well over 90% of the Cambodian population is made up of Buddhists, it is not at all difficult to find halal food here due to the efforts of some Malaysian entrepreneurs who have extended their halal food businesses to this country. Holiday Villa and D’Wau Restaurant are among the examples of Malaysians carrying out this collective duty of the Islamic faith here. D’Wau also has a branch in Siem Reap. Moreover, Cambodia has its own Muslim population, of whom a great majority can be found at Kampong Thorm, near Siem Reap. Thus, anyone who wishes to visit Angkor City need not worry about finding halal food here. And with that I leave you with pictures of the delicious halal meals we had in Cambodia!


Kembara kami di Kemboja

Oleh Wan Mokhsen Wan Mohd

Kembara kami (saya dan isteri comel saya :-D ) ke Kemboja dengan menaiki AirAsia pada Jun 2011 meninggalkan 1001 kenangan manis. Yelah, langsung tidak dirancang. Cuma kami sempat menjeling-jeling ke Wikitravel dan website AirAsia yang memberikan sedikit informasi mengenai Phnom Penh dan Siem Reap.

     Setibanya di Phnom Penh, kami disapa oleh seorang yang berkopiah. Cuak juga. Tak kenal dan tidak pernah berjanji temu.

“Assalamualaikum. Dari Malaysia kan?” kata si penyapa kami.

“Waalaikummussalam…Err…” saya menjawab…lantas dipotong…

“Jangan risau. Saya tak tipu orang… Mari ikut saya…”

     Saya dengan yakin berjalan mengikut dia dan dia memperkenalkan diri sebagai Ustaz Salleh. Bekerja sebagai pembawa teksi beroda tiga (seakan-akan tuk-tuk di kota Bangkok). Dia bertanyakan akan bajet kami dan kami menjawab kami berjalan-jalan dengan bajet rendah sahaja.

     Dengan muka redha dan nampak seakan-akan bersyukur, dia memberitahu kami akan tempat penginapan serta pakej langsung ke Siem Reap. “MURAH!!!” Di sebut dalam hati saya dan saya memandang isteri saya untuk tanda setuju. Isteri saya pun mengangguk. Dan lantas itulah, bermula pengembaraan kami.

     Phnom Penh, ibu kota Kemboja merupakan sebuah ibu kota lama dan sedang mengorak langkah untuk maju. Berada sahaja di sini, anda pasti merasakan semangat warga kota untuk mencari rezeki dan bersama-sama bekerjasama untuk keluar dari kelompok kemiskinan. Semangat luar biasa mereka menimbulkan keinsafan kepada kami.

     Saya dan isteri dibekalkan serunding, maggi dan macam-macam oleh mertua saya. Namun, sebenarnya, tidak susah mencari kedai makanan halal di Kemboja. Peluang itu tidak kami lepaskan untuk mencuba makanan tempatan! Sedap dan unik ! Paling tidakpun, KFC pun ada. HALAL dan dimiliki oleh KFC Malaysia! :-P

     Komuniti Islam di Kemboja telah diberi kebebasan ekonomi oleh pemerintahan serta aktiviti dakwah berkembang pesat walaupun penuh kedaifan. Kembara bersama Ustaz Salleh benar-benar memberi kelainan. Kami memang berhajat untuk berjumpa dengan komuniti Islam dan Ustaz Salleh selaku pemandu pelancong merupakan pilihan tepat secara kebetulan. Kami dibawa ke Perkampungan Islam Kemboja di Phnom Penh, melawat masjid-masjid yang turut menempatkan pusat pembelajaran untuk kanak-kanak Islam serta melihat aktiviti ekonomi setempat masyarakat Islam.

     Sedih, pilu, sebak dan kagum. Bercampur baur semua perasaan. Sedih melihat kedaifan masyarakat mereka. Pilu melihat usangnya kemudahan yang mereka ada. Dan kagum melihat semangat komuniti Islam mengharungi arus kemajuan bersama. Walau hanya bergajikan sedekah-sedekah masyarakat luar serta setempat, guru-guru agama tetap gagah mengajar anak didik ilmu-ilmu agama.

     Yang menarik di kebanyakan sekolah agama mereka, mereka belajar mengikut sukatan pelajaran Malaysia dan bahasa yang digunakan adalah Bahasa Malaysia! :-D

     Kami meneruskan perjalanan ke Siem Reap dengan menaiki bas. Berhati-hati ketika membeli tiket bas. Pastikan beli tiket hanya di kaunter dan mempunyai resit. Ulat-ulat di sini akan mengambil peluang dengan pelancong asing. Saya berkesempatan menyapa beberapa pelancong asing dan mereka kebanyakannya tertipu oleh ulat. Saya bersyukur tidak terkena.

     Pemandangan indah! Saujana mata memandang. Sepanjang perjalanan, hati tercuit melihat telatah anak-anak kecil berlari-lari, bermain permainan kampung, bermain sawah serta bermain di sungai (atau longkang?) dan ada juga membantu orang tua mereka mencari rezeki. Terleka dengan keindahan alam, kami tertidur.

     Setibanya di Siem Reap, kami disambut oleh anak buah Ustaz Salleh. Lewat tengah malam kami tiba. Kami terus dihantar ke hotel untuk berehat dan berjanji untuk berjumpa pada esok pagi untuk menikmati juadah tempatan! Muka saya tersenyum sebelum tidur. :-D

     Pagi yang dinantikan telah tiba. Kami bersarapan di warung sebelah masjid Siem Reap. Sedap!!!!!!! Terutamanya Kopi Kemboja (sila cuba yeeee). Kami membeli pek Kopi Kemboja dari makcik yang fasih berbahasa melayu. Katanya, dia pernah bekerja di Malaysia. Berbual-buallah kami akan apa yang menarik Siem Reap.

     Angkor Wat tidak kami lawati. Kesuntukan masa fikir kami. Sebab kami nak melawat perkampungan Islam dan masjid di sekitar. Kami menyusuri Tonle Sap dan melawat masjid terapung. Rupa-rupanya, komuniti Islam di Tonle Sap (dan semakin sedikit) adalah pelarian dari Vietnam. Terasa kepayahan mereka untuk berjuang untuk hidup.

     Banyak lagi untuk diceritakan mengenai Kemboja. Kalau nak lebih banyak lagi, lawatilah sendiri. Penerbangan AirAsia yang selesa serta menjanjikan tawaran terbaik menanti anda!

Kuala Lumpur (KUL) – Phnom Penh (PNH)
2 x HARIAN

 

No Penerbangan

Dari

Ke

Bertolak

Ketibaan

AK1476

KUL

PNH

06:45

07:35

AK1474

KUL

PNH

15:00

12:55

 

Kuala Lumpur (KUL) – Siem Reap (REP)
PENERBANGAN HARIAN

 

No Pernebangan

Dari

Ke

Bertolak

Ketibaan

AK1480

KUL

REP

06:50

07:50

* Waktu bertolak dan ketibaan mengikut waktu tempatan.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Catatan Perjalanan Kemboja

Oleh Maruwiah Ahmat

Kemboja mempunyai sejarah yang tersendiri, selain keagungan empayar Khmer di Angkor, terdapat sejarah hitam yang masih dikenang oleh penduduknya iaitu kekejaman rejim Pol Pot di bawah “Communist Party of Kampuchea”. Namun tinggalan sejarah Kemboja ini menjadi tarikan pelancong untuk mengunjungi Kemboja. Lebih 2 juta pengunjung melawat Angkor City setiap tahun dan pelancongan menjadi sumber ekonomi penting kepada Kemboja menduduki tempat kedua selepas industri tekstil.

     Meskipun baharu aman (1975), Kemboja pesat membangun kerana penduduknya gigih bekerja dan jarang ditemui peminta sedekah. Kebanyakannya berusaha mencari pendapatan dengan bekerja walaupun dengan hanya menjual kalungan bunga melur (untuk sembahyang/keberkatan bagi penganut Buddha) pada kadar 500 riel (USD 0.25).

     Saya ke Kemboja bersama seorang rakan (Norsiah Harun) pada 9 Mac yang lalu. Kami sampai di Phnon Penh kira-kira pukul 4.00 petang waktu tempatan. Dari atas kapal terbang saya lihat, buminya gersang. Cakap-cakap wanita Vietnam yang duduk di sebelah saya, Kemboja lebih panas dari Malaysia, saya akur dan telah bersedia dari segi mental. Setibanya di lapangan terbang, kami dijemput oleh pemandu hotel dan cuma bayar harga parkir 3500 riel (USD0.88). Kami menginap di Asia Hotel yang harganya cuma USD25 semalam. Menariknya di dalam hotel ini terdapat restoran KFC, perkataan halal dicatatkan di pintunya.

     Keesokan harinya, kami keluar dengan menaiki tut tut (Uncle Rom) cuma sedolar untuk ke New York Hotel. Di sana terletaknya D’Wau Restaurant, sebuah restoran yang diusahakan oleh warga Melayu Malaysia. Saya makan nasi pattaya, dan Norsiah makan Nasi Lok Lak (ada pengaruh Kemboja) dan ia memang sedap. Memang seronok dapat menikmati makanan yang pasti halal dan sedap di bumi orang lain. Setelah makan, tuan punya restoran memberi panduan serba sedikit untuk berjalan-jalan di Phnom Penh dan Siem Reap. Seorang pemandu tut tut (Zamry-seorang Melayu Cam beragama Islam) juga ada di situ. Kami minta dia bawa kami ke Central Market dengan harga USD1.

     Pada hari Isnin, kami pergi ke Siem Reap menaiki bas dengan harga USD24 seorang. Bas bertolak pukul 7 pagi dan kira-kira 6 jam kemudian baru kami sampai di Siem Reap. Biasanya pelancong datang ke Siem Reap tidak kembali semula ke Phnom Penh atau terus datang ke Siem Reap dan kemudian ke Phnom Penh. Kami pula ulang alik, banyaklah kosnya namun berbaloi untuk mencuba pengalaman yang baru. Dari Central Market, kami berjalan sahaja menuju Asia Hotel dan berkemas. Jarak Asia Hotel ke Holiday Villa hanya 280m. Holiday Villa dimiliki oleh orang Malaysia dan menyediakan makanan halal. Malam itu kami memesan makanan dari bilik dan merasa sedikit hidangan Kemboja. Saya memesan kerabu mangga Kemboja dan sejenis makanan tradisi Khmer yang mengandungi sotong dan ikan.

     Seperti biasa, di stesen bas, tut tut telah menunggu dan mereka juga bertindak sebagai pemandu pelancong. Kami terus ke Angkor City, bayaran masuk ialah USD20 seorang. Kami tidak mengambil masa yang lama untuk melawat tiga kuil yang utama kerana resah, bimbang tidak dapat bersolat. Pemandu tut tut itu juga akui bahawa kamilah orang yang paling cepat melawat, biasanya pelancong akan mengambil dua hingga tiga jam untuk satu kuil. Tapi kami habis 3 jam untuk ketiga-tiga kuil. Lagipun kami cuma hendak melihat-lihat sahaja tinggalan zaman keagungan Empayar Angkor. Pemandu tut tut itu membawa kami ke masjid di Siem Reap yang jaraknya kira-kira 1km sahaja dari pusat bandar.

     Kami sampai di Masjid Naekmah kira-kira pukul 5 petang yang sedang diubah suai. Ada seorang Melayu Cam yang rumahnya berdekatan datang mempelawa kami bersolat di rumahnya. Alhamdulillah. Tanpa fikir panjang kami terus menurut. Datang pula makcik jirannya yang juga berbahasa Melayu menyapa kami. Dia menemani kami sehingga kami habis solat.

     Setelah meninggalkan rumah itu, kami singgah di Restoran Muslim berdekatan. Lapar sungguh, kami hanya makan sarapan di hotel pukul 6.00 pagi tadi. Alhamdulillah makanannya di masak ala Thai amat sedap dan menyelerakan. Paling bagusnya semua sekali kami memakan hanya USD7.50.

     Setelah habis makan, kami berjalan ke Bandar Siem Reap yang jaraknya hanya 1km dari masjid dan restoran tadi. Setiba kami di bandar, kawan saya mengambil masa melayari internet di kafe siber manakala saya meluruskan kaki di spa, membuat refleksologi dengan harga USD5.00 untuk 1 jam. Murah tu, mana nak dapat di Malaysia.

     Kira-kira pukul 7.50 kami sampai di hentian bas yang akan membawa kami pulang ke Phnom Penh. Terperanjat saya sebentar. Pernahkah anda menaiki bas yang tiada kerusi duduk? Saya tak tahulah bas seumpama ini ada di mana-mana penjuru dunia, tapi inilah pertama kami menaiki bas begini.. Nama basnya Night Bus dan ia hanya berjalan malam. Cuma yang ada katil-katil ala-ala katil hospital yang ditegakkan sedikit bahagian kepala. Bukan kami sahaja yang tersenyum-senyum dan sesekali ketawa bahkan pelancong asing Eropah yang memenuhi bas itu pun tersenyum-senyum dan ketawa sesama sendiri. Lucu kami berlarutan beberapa waktu, maklumlah pengalaman pertama. Mujurlah kami dapat katil tingkat atas, jadi tidaklah terperap sangat. Kami juga diberi air mineral sebotol seorang dan perjalanan yang mengambil masa enam jam juga itu tidaklah terasa bosan sangat, sebab kami asyik tidur walaupun sesekali terjaga dek bising hon bas.

     Penggunaan hon di Kemboja adalah sebagai amaran, sama seperti di Indonesia. Oleh itu bunyi hon kedengaran acap kali. Berbeza di Malaysia, hon dibunyikan dalam suasana genting, walaupun jarang kedengaran, hon lebih bermaksud tanda kemarahan, atau setidak-tidaknya akibat geram. Hari kami berakhir pada pukul 1.42 pagi apabila kami sampai di Phnom Penh.

     Pada hari selasa, selepas sarapan kami ke Killing Fields, di mana berlakunya tempat pembunuhan penduduk Kemboja di bawah Khmer Rouge. Kos tut tut ialah USD10 untuk ke kawasan ini di hujung Bandar Phnom Penh. Manakala tiket masuk adalah USD5 dengan alat dengar pelbagai bahasa atau USD2 tanpa alat dengar. Mengikuti rombongan mereka, kami agak menyayat hati melihat dan mendengar ceritanya. Saya merasa sebak, tapi masih boleh bertahan namun saya kelihatan ada pelancong wanita asing yang menangis teresak-esak mendengar ceritanya.

     Sekembali dari Killing Fields, kami menikmati makanan tengah hari di hotel. Saya makan tom yam, manakala kawan saya menikmati nasi claypot. Pada waktu petang kami hanya rehat sahaja di hotel sebelum pulang ke Malaysia keesokan paginya.

     Meskipun penduduk Kemboja lebih 90% beragama Buddha, tidak susah mencari makanan halal di negara itu kerana adanya usaha-usaha warga Malaysia untuk melebarkan sayap perniagaan makanan halal di negara itu. Holiday Villa dan D’Wau Restaurant antara contoh amalan Fardu Kifayah penduduk Malaysia dilaksanakan di sana. D’Wau juga mempunyai cawangannya di Siem Reap. Lagipun Kemboja sendiri mempunyai penduduk Islamnya yang sebahagian besar terdapat di Kampong Thorm yang berdekatan dengan Siem Reap. Jadi sesiapa yang mahu melawat Angkor City tidaklah perlu bimbang akan makanan halal di sini.

  

EXCITED ABOUT PHNOM PENH?
  • Mokhsen1706

    thanks airasia!!!! :)

    • http://www.airasia.com/travel360 Travel 3Sixty

      Thank YOU and we hope you’ll keep sharing your photos and stories with us! Stay in touch :-)

  • http://www.srilankan.com/en-US/Home/flights-bangkok Cheap flights to Bangkok

    It’s something very
    rare to hear about Cambodia, most of the people don’t focus on this particular country,
    after reading the information I am pretty impressed with their education system
    and special dishes. Guess people should try Cambodia for vacation options. Interesting
    information though!

     

    • http://www.airasia.com/travel360 Travel 3Sixty

      Yes, we couldn’t agree more. Most tourists seem to
      overlook Cambodia’s beautiful culture and amazing sights but we hope to
      highlight more of this country.

  • cambodia tours

    great stuff

  • Andrew Bailey

    I went through Cambodia last week on a off road motorcycle, with Cambodia Motorbike Tours. Saw lots of the country spoke to lots of people and absolutely loved the place. Very wet at the moment with flooding but we still got through it and had a ball, the people are so friendly and happy. Lots of waving as we went by.

    • http://www.airasia.com/travel3sixty Travel 3Sixty

      Wow, off-road motorcycle? It must have been quite the adventure.
      Do you have any pic to share with us?

  • http://www.airasia.com/travel3sixty Travel 3Sixty

    Wow, off-road motorcycle? It must have been quite the adventure. Do you have any pic to share with us ?